20 February Book launch of The Interbrain. Lecture on the interbrain by Digby Tantam

This event is free, and preceded by a launch (starting at 6pm) of Digby’s new book, published by Jessica Kingsley.  Described by Steve Silberman, author of ‘NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism’ and ‘How to Think Smarter About People Who Think Differently as “a groundbreaking, wide-ranging, and endlessly fascinating meditation on our innate ability to feel ‘connected’ to other people — and on what can happen when that precious connection is diminished. It’s compelling reading for anyone interested in the subtle mechanisms at work behind the essential experiences that make us human”

20 January 2018 Stranger, other, outsider: Talk by Claire Marshall

Stranger, other, outsider: The conceptualization of forced migrants in contemporary culture.
Refugees, internally displaced people and asylum seekers are all legal terms for people who have been forced to leave their homes because of war, persecution or natural disaster. How forced migrants are conceptualized speaks of our own relationship with identity and community. This phenomenon will be examined in the context of geopolitical discourses, social narratives and humanitarian responses. The psychology of migration also raises issues of ethics and social justice, pertinent to any therapists working with ‘diversity and difference’.
Dr Claire Marshall is a Counselling Psychologist with 10 years of experience in private health care, third sector and management of organisations. She has previously managed a psychotherapy service in North London with key responsibility for overall service and operations, including recruitment, supervision, management of staff, clinical assessments, allocation decisions and evaluating treatment options within the service. She also ran groups and worked with people one to one, providing short and long term psychological interventions for adults with a range of issues.

Watch the video on Vimeo

19 November 2017 Shared values – Working together existential and cognitive therapy. Talk by Melvyn Flitman

Despite its effectiveness, cognitive-behaviour therapy has been criticised for its brevity, symptom-focused orientation, and application scope. Existential therapies tend to be longer and encourage overall meaning-making.

This talk presents valuable insights based 254 accredited cognitive theorists who were inquired about their views and attitudes regarding cognitive-behaviour therapy, existentialist therapies, and the integration of both modalities.

Results of the research showed that existentialist therapies could compensate for cognitive-behavioural therapies’ eventual lack of depth, fluidity, authenticity, humanity, and application scope. They were a more personalized approach, suitable and/or beneficial for certain therapists, clients, circumstances, and/or problems. They were sometimes utilized and unsystematically integrated with cognitive-behavioural therapies. Institutional power struggles, existentialist therapies’ limitations, and therapists’ lack of training and/or knowledge prevented their more extensive use. That is, compounding whatever familiarity issue was the hesitance to use such approaches, led in part by institutional biases in favour of cognitive-behaviour therapy and against approaches that are less easily measured. Nevertheless, their combination appeared as a promising endeavour that, if implemented properly, such as through training, could arguably marry the strengths of both approaches.